Dan Hauser’s Last Letter


From Dan Hauser, a Florida death row prisoner.

“Over the last few years I have written hundreds upon hundreds of letters to Buddhist groups all over the world, asking for all forms of help, from books to help me learn more and more about Buddhism, to letters to be shown prison staff to help change the way Buddhists prisoners were looked upon, from one of fear born out of a misunderstanding of Buddhism and a general distrust of prisons, to one of a clearer understanding and a greater willingness to listen to what is requested on a case by case basis with an open mind.

With the help of these Buddhist groups and people, the prison system has changed its stance on many things, allowing in items like malas, meditation cushions and medallions and chains.

For a long time my primary distinction was Florida Death Row Prisoner, and thru all my extended contact with these Buddhist groups that was always Human Being, such a small thing to some, but one that had a profound effect on how I looked at others, a great lesson for me.

I have tried to thank each and every person directly, but I am sure that I have missed some of those who with great compassion an unquestioning willingness to help, provided me with the means and the strength to use right action and, (I hope) skillful means to change a system.

This letter is to show my gratitude to those who I may have not been able to thank, to those that I was, and to show everybody else the unselfish manner in which I was helped by all. May whatever merit accrued thru our actions be dedicated to all sentient beings.”

With Metta,  Dan Hauser

Dan Hauser was executed by the State of Florida on 25 August 2000 at 6pm EST.

#Buddhism #DeathRow

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